google sheet for marketing part 2
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The Ultimate Guide To Google Sheets For The Marketers: Part 2 – Using Formulas

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If you are looking for a comprehensive guide on Google Sheets, look no further. In this article, I'll show you how to use formulas to calculate and answer questions in your spreadsheet.

Formula Basics

Google Sheets is a powerful tool for marketers. It has many features that make it ideal for marketing tasks. One of the most powerful features of Google Sheets is its ability to use formulas.

Formulas are equations that can be used to perform calculations on data. They can be used to sum numbers, average values, count cells, and more. Formulas are a vital part of Google Sheets and can be used to great effect in marketing tasks.

There are two types of formulas in Google Sheets: relative and absolute. Relative formulas are relative to the cell they are entered into. For example, if you enter a formula into cell A1 that sums the values in cells A2 through A5, the formula will still work if you move it to cell B1. Absolute formulas, on the other hand, are not relative to the cell they are entered into. This means that if you enter an absolute formula into cell A1 and then move it to cell B1, the formula will no longer work correctly.

To use a formula in Google Sheets, simply type it into a cell. For example, to sum the values in cells A2 through A5, you would type =SUM

10 Must-Know Google Sheets Formulas

Google Sheets is a powerful tool for marketing data analysis. But, it can be tough to know where to start. This guide will show you 10 must-know Google Sheets formulas for marketers, so you can get the most out of your data.

SUM: This formula adds up all the numbers in a range of cells. For example, you could use SUM to calculate the total cost of expenses for each month in your budget.

AVERAGEIF: This formula calculates the average of cells that meet a certain criterion. For example, you could use AVERAGEIF to calculate the average of all cells that contain the word “expenses”.

MAX: This formula returns the maximum value in a range of cells. For example, you could use MAX to find the largest value in a range of cells containing sales data.

MIN: This formula returns the minimum value in a range of cells. For example, you could use MIN to find the smallest value in a range of cells containing sales data.

COUNT: This formula counts the number of cells in a range. For example, you could use COUNT to count the number of cells that contain sales data.

COUNTIF: This formula counts cells in a range that meet a certain criterion. For example, you could use COUNTIF to count the number of expenses in a range of cells.

SUMIF: This formula sums up the values of cells that meet a certain criterion. For example, you could use SUMIF to sum the values of all cells that contain the word “sales”.

FILTER: This formula filters the values in a range of cells to include only those that meet a certain criterion. For example, you could use FILTER to filter a range of sales data so it includes only the sales for your best-selling product.

FIND: This formula finds the position of one text string within another text string. For example, you could use FIND to find the first time your business name appears in a document.

HLOOKUP: This formula looks up data in a table (hence its name) and retrieves the value that corresponds to a certain row and column combination (a 2-D lookup). For example, you could use HLOOKUP to identify which customers are located in the state of New York.6

VLOOKUP: This formula also looks up data in a table, but it retrieves values from columns rather than rows (a 1-D lookup). For example, you could use VLOOKUP to identify the average sales amount for each region in your business.

MATCH: This formula finds the relative position of one text string within another text string. For example, you could use MATCH to determine whether a product description correlates with the actual product name.

SPLIT: This formula splits one text string into two or more text strings. For example, you could use SPLIT to separate a single product description into multiple pieces of data (e.g., Brand, Category, Model).

MOD: This formula divides one number by another number, and returns only the remainder of that division operation. For example, you could use MOD to identify the units sold after a discount is applied.

ROUND: This formula rounds off numbers to specific decimal places based

SUBSTITUTE: This formula replaces a specific substring in a text string with another substring. For example, you could use SUBSTITUTE to replace all instances of “Product” with “P 1. MATCH: This formula finds the position (or match) of one value inside another value. For example, you could use MATCH to determine which product description is displayed when viewing a list of products.

PROPER: This formula capitalizes the initial letter of each word in a text string. For example, you could use PROPER to change book to Book in a product description.

Combining Functions to Give You More

There are a lot of different functions that you can use in Google Sheets. However, you can also combine different functions to give you even more power and flexibility.

For example, let's say you want to find the average of a range of cells. You can use the AVERAGE function for this. However, what if you only want to include cells that contain a certain value? You can use the AVERAGEIF function for this. This function lets you specify criteria that cells must meet in order to be included in the average.

You can also use the SUMIF function to sum only the cells that meet certain criteria. This can be very useful if you want to total up only certain types of data.

There are many other functions that you can combine in similar ways. Experiment with different combinations to see what you can come up with.

Formula Tips and Tricks

There are a few things to keep in mind when using formulas in Google Sheets. First, make sure to enclose all formula arguments in parentheses. This will help prevent errors. Second, use the correct syntax for each formula. For example, the syntax for the SUM formula is =SUM(A1:A10). Third, always double-check your formulas before you hit enter. This will help ensure that you get the results you expect.

One of the most powerful things about formulas is that they can be used to reference other cells in the sheet. This makes it easy to perform calculations on large data sets. To reference a cell, simply use the cell address in the formula, such as =A1+B1. You can also reference cells in other sheets by using the sheet name followed by the cell address, such as =Sheet1!A1+Sheet2!B1.

Formulas can also be used to create conditional statements. For example, you could use the IF formula to check if a cell contains a certain value, and then return a different value depending on the result. The syntax for this formula is =IF(logical_test, value_if_true

Conclusion

Overall, Google Sheets is an extremely powerful tool for marketers. It can be used for a wide variety of tasks, from analyzing data to creating complex marketing campaigns. With its vast array of features and functions, there is almost no limit to what you can do with it.

If you're not already using Google Sheets, now is the time to start. It's a versatile tool that can save you a lot of time and effort. And, with a little practice, you'll be able to master all of its features and

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